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February 2018

Global Spotlight Week • Moment of Truth: How Russian-Style Reality Came To America

February 22 @ 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Misinformation. Misdirection. Fake News. Russian meddling. After more than a year in a new, Russian-style fog machine, the American public has learned one thing: Sunlight remains the best disinfectant. Real information -- provided by professional, credible journalists with standards and ethics -- still has the power to cut through the confusion. Investigative journalists have rallied to unearth new details about the Russia investigation, secret changes at federal agencies and presidential business dealings, cutting through distortions and conspiracy theories with solid,…

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March 2018

Judiciary Reforms in Poland as a Threat to the Principle of the Rule of Law

March 6 @ 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Agata Hauser is a lecturer in the Constitutional Law Department at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland. Her research focuses on judicial protection of individuals by the Court of Justice of the EU and the European Court of Human Rights, the interactions between the EU and the Council of Europe, and application of the EU law by national courts of the member states.

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Administrative Courts in the Polish Legal System

March 8 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Agata Hauser is a lecturer in the Constitutional Law Department at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland. Her research focuses on judicial protection of individuals by the Court of Justice of the EU and the European Court of Human Rights, the interactions between the EU and the Council of Europe, and application of the EU law by national courts of the member states. This talk is hosted by the UNC School of Government. Co-sponsored by CSEEES.

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Carolina Seminar • Dmitry Shostakovich and Mainstream Soviet Cinema

March 8 @ 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Dmitry Shostakovich’s long and impressive career in film scoring from 1929 to 1971 uniquely positioned him to participate in the cultural politics of cinema, and allow him a space where he could hone his skill as a film composer. As the first designated “film composer” in 1929, he built a career in film scoring that matured during high Stalinism and beyond. In this time, in collaboration with directors such as Grigory Kozintsev, Sergey Gerasimov, the Vasilyev brothers, and Aleksandr Dovzhenko,…

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Visegrad Talk • Ethnicity and Race in Poland, Politics, and Mobility of Knowledge, 1918–1952

March 20 @ 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Until the mid-twentieth century, studies of ethnicity and race were a source of an epistemological and political competition between scientific schools in Europe and the United States. As a result, the ubiquitous notions developed in the post-World War I period, such as ethnic and racial differences, civilization, national character, culture areas, and cultural patterns traveled across borders and time. This presentation will explore how these notions were integrated, domesticated, and altered to fit into debates on a complex relationship between science, modern society, and…

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April 2018

Carolina Seminar • Politics of History in the 1980s – 2000s (the ‘New Europe’ and Ukraine)

April 5 @ 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

This presentation will offer an overview of ideas in Dr. Georgiy Kasianov's most recently completed research project on misuse of history and 'historical memory' in ideological debates in East Europe. Dr. Kasianov will also introduce his current work in progress "Image of the Other: the Past and the Present (Ukraine, Poland, Russia)." The paper can be accessed here. Georgiy Kasianov (Visiting Fulbright Scholar) is the chair of the Department of Contemporary History and Politics at the Institute of History of Ukraine (Kyiv) and a professor at…

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Visegrad Talk • “Who Belongs?”: Contesting Citizenship in Central Europe

April 17 @ 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

The migrant crisis in 2015 has caught most European countries unprepared and solicited diverse responses from the "old" and "new" Europe. Central European countries responded with almost hysterical fear and rejection of the possibility to settle some of the incoming refugees on their territory. This reaction has historical and cultural roots upon which the very conception of citizenship is defined and interpreted. It is connected to an exclusivist idea of a state-forming nation in this region, which already perceives the "old" ethnic minorities…

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Carolina Seminar • Elizabethan “Intermezzo”: Shaping the Russian Empire in the Mid-18th Century

April 26 @ 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Unlike Peter I and Catherine II, Empress Elizabeth (r. 1741-61) is not known for her imperial strategy. Yet, her reign witnessed important developments in all of the empire’s border regions, from the annexation of a piece of Finland as a result of the Treaty of Åbo (1743) to the encounter with the Bashkirs, linked to intensive industrial development in the Urals. This paper will attempt an overview of Elizabeth’s empire, both from the perspective of key issues in the border areas and from that of imperial policy.…

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